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Libraries for Universal Accessibility

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Monthly Archives: November 2012

Using the Microsoft Office 2010 Built-In Accessibility Checker

Similar to spelling checker alerting you to potential spelling errors, Accessibility Checker alerts you to certain accessibility issues in your file so that you can fix potential problems that might keep someone with a disability from accessing your content. To access this feature for Office 2010 documents, click the File tab. Click Info. Under Prepare for Sharing, an alert will appear if Accessibility Checker has detected…

Accessibility Tips for Microsoft PowerPoint

You can make your PowerPoint document more accessible to individuals with disabilities using assistive technology (i.e., screen reading software, voice recognition software, etc.) by following some simple tips. Accessibility concerns should be addressed prior distributing your document or posting it on your courseware or departmental website. Add alternate text description (alt text) for all images, charts, graphs, SmartArt, etc. Ensure…

VPAT example

A Voluntary Product Accessibility Template™ or VPAT™ is a form that can help you come to an agreement with your vendors on the expected acceptable level of accessibility your organization requires. George Mason University has shared their Assistive Technology Initiatives “Voluntary Product Accessibility Template” for software applications and operating systems, Web based Inter/Intranet information services and applications, telecommunications and products,…

Accessibility Tips for PDF Documents and Forms

To test your PDF documents for accessibility, complete the following steps (in Adobe Reader or Acrobat): 1.     Click on the ‘View‘ pull-down menu > Read Out Loud > Activate Read Out Loud, followed by the ‘View‘ pull-down menu > Read Out Loud > Read This Page Only. 2.     If the document reads aloud, but the text is read out of order, adding “tags” to the document may help.…